Camera Shots

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Long Shot-This shot shows a figure from head to toe in order to show the details in a scene that you do not want to be missed. This shot allows the background to be shown and it usually follows an extreme long shot.

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Mid Shot- This shot is used to show the upper part of the persons body, usually from the hips upwards. It is important that this shot shows the persons arms are in the shot to help show what the person in the shot is doing. This shot allows the facial expressions of the person to be seen without it being a close-up.

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Bird’s-eye view/High Angle Shot- This shot is taken above the figure from a distance, this allows the audience to feel as though they are looking down on the character in a shot. As the picture is not taken directly above the figure, it could also be a high angle shot, this is to add a more natural feel to the shot, to make it look like a character is just looking down on something.

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Low Angle Shot-This shot is used to make the figure in the shot look taller and bigger then they truly are. This allows the character to seem in control and over powering. It is the opposite to a high angle shot, to make the audience feel as though they are looking up at the character.

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Close-Up- This shot is used to limit the frame of the shot to a certain view, usually a characters face. The background is unfocused and looks blurred so your attention is drawn to the shot. This shot allows facial expressions to be empathized.

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Extreme Close-Up- This shot is used to focus on details that are not usually seen from an average distance. The background of the shot is not seen so that attention is focused plainly on the thing that is zoomed in.

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Over the Shoulder Shot- This shot is done behind a character who is looking at another character. This shot allows the audience to feel as though they are looking at something through someone else’s eyes/point of view. This usually occurs during a conversation, to alternate between the characters to help follow the conversation.

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